Scientific knowledge vs. consumer experience

Disparate views between
scientists and consumers
(Drawing: Robin Hutton)

Scientists have long recommended that we eat at least 400g of fruit and vegetables a day with some countries going even further. Australia recommends a daily intake of two fruit and five vegetable portions equivalent to 750g. But the experience of consumers is that this is almost impossible and anyway could be quite expensive depending on seasonality and regional availability.

Many scientists believe that genetically modified agricultural commodities will solve future food shortages following an increasing world population and harsher growing conditions due to global warming. The public is sceptical having experienced previous backlashes. Monocultures are expected to threaten species versatility and superweeds to overwhelm production systems.

Scientists warn about an ‘obesity epidemic’ that will overwhelm the future hospital system and issue nutrition recommendations. The general public experiences an increasingly busy lifestyle with work pressure inundating leisure time. There is little time for food preparation and a living environment conducive of exercise is missing.

What to do?

These are some of the topics discussed in a just released rather unique book that combine the views of sociological and public health expertise to provide a holistic discussion of food safety issues.

The book offers a comprehensive understanding of the current scientific knowledge concerning risks associated with food production, processing and consumption, with particular attention to the gap between scientific research and public perception.

The book is thematically arranged according to the application of theoretical approaches in sociological theory – the socio-cultural perspective, the risk society perspective and the governmentality perspective – each chapter focuses on a particular area of interest or concern in relation to food, for example:

  • the ‘obesity epidemic’,
  • the benefits or otherwise of dietary supplements,
  • caffeine consumption,
  • GM food,
  • alcohol,
  • organic food,
  • the consumption of fruit and vegetables, and
  • pathogens and contaminants.

The existing literature is covered in detail and the book offers illustrative empirical examples, whilst identifying gaps in knowledge and areas for further research.

Interested?

The book is available now from Routledge:

Risk book

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food and the Risk Society
The Power of Risk Perception
By Charlotte Fabiansson, Stefan Fabiansson

ISBN 978-1-472-47896-2
© 2016 – Routledge

282 pages

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s